God Bless you, Dr. Kevorkian

by Kurt Vonnegut

I got this book for my birthday because the person heard that I liked Vonnegut and he liked the green cartoon cover. I scanned the back cover and found it ironic that I got a book about death on my birthday.

kurtvon

I shrivel up at any mention of death. One vivid memory of childhood was crying myself to sleep about the imminence of death, something that was (and hopefully still is) so far away that it almost didn’t seem real but it is more real and more reliable than anything else in the world. I no longer cry myself to sleep about death but I still fear it immensely, not so much for myself, but for other people and what would be the result of me when I’m left all alone.

I’m quite selfish that way.

Vonnegut, with the aid of Dr. Kervokian, has several near death experiences just so that he can interview the already deceased in heaven. Well Vonnegut can’t step in heaven but he can hang around the pearly white gates and interview those that are around. He gets up and close with the likes of William Shakespear, Newton, Mary Shelley, and many many others.

We hear some insight from the greats through the charmed writings of Vonnegut, it is so lovely of a read, even if it is about death.

the entire book will take you about 30 minutes even if you are not that fast of a reader.

Highly recommended, feel light afterwards, and it’s exactly not as it seems.

QUOTE

“One last question,” I begged. “To what do you attribute your incredible productivity?”
Isaac Asimov replied with but a single word: “Escape.” And then he appended a famous statement by the similarly prolific French writer Jean Paul Sartre:
“Hell is other people.”

Posted: January 31st, 2013
Categories: BOOKS
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